U.S. Geological Survey

The documents listed below were authored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

This report presents a flood-duration flow frequency analysis for selected durations (1 day, 3 day, 7 day, 15 day, and 30 day) at 173 streamgaging stations throughout Arizona and in western New Mexico.

Computed flood flow frequency and volume‐duration‐frequency values for points of interest on Queen Creek and Devil’s Canyon. The intent is to quantify surface water hydrology in these two watersheds to assist Resolution Copper Mining (RCM) with assessment of potential impacts to surface water flows associated with the proposed mining and associated activities near Superior, Arizona.

Flooding is among the worst natural disasters responsible for loss of life and property in Arizona, underscoring the importance of accurate estimation of flood magnitude for proper structural design and floodplain mapping. Twenty-four years of additional peak-flow data have been recorded since the last comprehensive regional flood frequency analysis conducted in Arizona. Periodically, flood frequency estimates and regional regression equations must be revised to maintain the accurate estimation of flood frequency and magnitude.

After more than a century of research, geologists and other scientists have increased their understanding of the tectonic processes at work in the Wasatch Front and are now beginning to answer the questions about the seismicity and tectonics of the Wasatch Front that Gilbert and others first posed Scientists, engineers, architects, urban planners, and emergency managers are not waiting for a major earthquake disaster to learn that measures must be implemented to mitigate an earthquake's effects.

California’s 35 million people live among some of the most active earthquake faults in the United States. Public safety demands credible assessments of the earthquake hazard to maintain appropriate building codes for safe construction and earthquake insurance for loss protection. Seismic hazard analysis begins with an earthquake rupture forecast—a model of probabilities that earthquakes of specified magnitudes, locations, and faulting types will occur during a specified time interval.

The 2008 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Maps display earthquake ground motions for various probability levels across the United States and are applied in seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy.

This paper is a progress report on the mapping effort for the central and eastern U.S.

Here we are concerned with solving for the long term average values of these parameters for the state of California. My primary data source is a catalog of 1850-2006 M 4.0 seismicity compiled with Tianqing Cao (Appendix H). Because earthquakes outside of the state can influence California I consider both earthquakes within the state and within 100 km of the state border (Figure 1).

This report presents an analysis of the basin geometry and structure of the San Rafael basin in southeastern Arizona. In addition, a new methodology for inferring concealed lithology is presented and applied in the San Rafael basin.

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EIS Status Update - March 2019

Screenshot of EIS Status Update document cover

Information on the forthcoming Draft EIS is now available under the ‘EIS Info’ tab. To view the update, click here.

EIS Timeline - Feb 2019

  1. Proponent submits revised Plan of Operations [Sep 2014]
  2. Federal Register Notice of Intent to prepare EIS [Mar 2016]
  3. Public scoping period and scoping meetings
    [5 meetings between Mar-Jun 2016; comment period extended from 60 days to 120 days, closed Jul 18, 2016 ]
  4. Compile and review existing data
  5. Prepare project description and identify project alternatives
  6. Publish Alternatives Evaluation Report [Sep 2017]
  7. We Are Here
    Validate Baseline Information; analyze environmental effects
  8. Prepare Draft EIS
  9. Federal Register Notice of Availability of Draft EIS
  10. 90-day public review and comment period, with public meetings
  11. Respond to public comments and prepare Final EIS
  12. Federal Register Notice of Availability of Final EIS and Draft ROD
  13. 45-day Public Objection Period
  14. Resolve objections to Final EIS and draft ROD
  15. Issue Final Record of Decision

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Forest Points of Contact

Media & General Info
John Scaggs
jscaggs@fs.fed.us

Project Manager
Resolution Copper
Mary Rasmussen
mcrasmussen@fs.fed.us

Apache Leap Special Management Area
Apache Leap SMA website