Appendix I

These documents include technical reports, memorandum, scientific journal articles, and others cited in the General Plan of Operations - Volume 3 - Appendix I (GPO). They are available for download as PDF files wherever possible.

Paleoseismological data for the Wasatch and San Andreas fault zones have led to the formulation of the characteristic earthquake model, which postulates that individual faults and fault segments tend to generate essentially same size or characteristic earthquakes having a relatively narrow range of magnitudes near the maximum.

Several methods for evaluating the effect of local soil conditions on ground response during earthquakes are presently available. Most of these methods are based on the assumption that the main responses in a soil deposit are caused by the upward propagation of shear waves from the underlying rock formation. Analytical procedures based on this concept incorporating nonlinear soil behavior, have been shown to give results in good agreement with field observations in a number of cases.

The Frazier Mountain paleoseismic site is located on a poorly understood section of the southern San Andreas fault, mid-way between the well-known Carrizo Plain and Mojave sites of Bidart Fan and Pallett Creek. Emerging paleoseismic evidence indicates that earthquakes along this stretch repeat at a similar pace, with an average interval of - 122 years between AD. 1000 and 1857.

Changes since 1855 in reported section-line lengths and positions of survey monuments that span the San Andreas fault (SAF) were used to measure displacement interpreted to be from the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake in south-central California. In 1855–1856 James E. Freeman established township and range lines across the SAF between Rancho Cholame and the northern Carrizo Plain. At least 26 1-mile sections lines spanned the SAF in the area between present-day California Highways 46 and 58. Each section line was marked by monuments at the midpoint and endpoints.

This geologic map was produced to compile and reinterpret published geologic information, and present the result of new geologic mapping in the Ray-Superior area. This data set serves as the basis for ongoing efforts to better understand the geologic history of this area, particularly with respect to the distribution and origin of mineral deposits.

Have earthquakes strong enough to rupture the ground surface occurred on faults in central Arizona during the recent geologic past? Could such earthquakes happen in the future? If so, where are they most likely to occur? The Seismotectonics and Geophysics Section of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has, during the last 6 years, been working on answering these questions

Horseshoe and Bartlett Dams are located In the Transition Zone of central Arizona. Within this province, faults with evidence of Quaternary activity are widely scattered, and selsmiclty Is low In comparison to other parts of the western United States. However, most of the known or suspected Quaternary faults and most of the historic selsmlclty In Arizona occur within or adjacent to the Transition Zone.

The 2008 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Maps display earthquake ground motions for various probability levels across the United States and are applied in seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy.

The Mogollon (muh-ge-own) Escarpment of central Arizona is one of the State's spectacular natural attractions, especially when viewed from the rim of its precipitate cliffs.

This report presents an assessment of the seismic hazard associated with the Sugarloaf fault, which crosses State Route (SR) 87 near Mesquite Wash in central Arizona. The Sugarloaf fault is a 20 km (12 mile) long, northwest- to north-trending normal fault with displacement down to the east. We conducted a multi-faceted investigation in order to evaluate the late Quaternary behavior of the Sugarloaf fault and assess the seismic hazard associated with it.

Pages

Public Hearing Comments Available

Comments from each of the six public hearings are available for viewing. Note that the public comment period is now closed.

Public Hearing Comments

Draft EIS

Media & General Info

Point of Contact
John Scaggs
Tonto National Forest
john.scaggs@usda.gov

Apache Leap Special Management Area
Apache Leap SMA website